Confirm Spelling of All Names:  Please take the time to verify the spelling of all names your documents. While it is not absolutely necessary to update the documents when a name later changes, it is best to list the current legal name for each child, executor, agent, and beneficiary before you sign any new documents. If there are corrections, please let us know as soon as possible so that we may change the document before printing them in final form for our appointment.


Confirm the Identity and Order of Your Finance Agents:   In general, you should feel comfortable with who, and in what order, you have nominated to step in to manage your finances if you can no longer do so. If you need more information before deciding, please let us know so that we may provide further guidance.
  

Confirm the Identity and Order of your Healthcare Agents:   In general, you should feel comfortable with who, and in what order, you have nominated to direct your healthcare treatment if you can no longer communicate with your medical providers. If you are having second thoughts about the people you initially selected, please let us know so that we may provide further guidance.


Remember, during our meeting to sign your documents, we will explain how each document works and the role of each person you have named as an agent. We will provide some specific examples of what your agent might handle if they must take over because you have become incapacitated or when you pass away. 

1)  Stop treatment that prolongs your life. Instead, receive only treatment that focuses on your comfort and quality of life; or
2)  Don't stop treatment that prolongs your life.

your draft estate planning documents,

Organ Donation (Part 3 of the form): One of the most common questions we receive is whether or not someone should become an organ donor. We believe that the decision to or not to participate as an organ or tissue donor is a personal choice. Because we are not experts in the field, we thought it best to direct you to a few resources to help you make an informed decision.


First, we suggest you have a conversation with your doctor.  He or she will be able to answer any questions you may have, as well as debunk the myths about how health or age affect your suitability as a donor.


Second, the links below will direct you to various non-profit organizations that promote organ donation.  You should feel free to search the internet for other reliable organizations to answer questions you may have.


                   Donate Life America:  



                   Donate Life California: 

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If you would like more information as you review

End of Life Decision Making (Part 2 of the form):  The decision to receive treatments that may help you live longer is a personal one. You may want a say in this decision or you may simply want your healthcare agent to follow your doctor's recommendation. Either way, you should understand what your choices are and provide your agent with direction on your preferences.  Below is some information to get your started.  If you have specific questions, we encourage you to talk to your doctor before you decide.


​In general, you have two options with regard to life sustaining treatment (life support): 
  




Important Thoughts to Keep in Mind


Please review your documents for the following in advance of our meeting

Your ADVANCED HEALTH CARE DIRECTIVE document

you have found the right place

Even though treatment focuses on helping you live longer, it may cause side effects that can greatly affect your quality of life and your ability to spend time with your family and friends.

If you still have personal goals that you want to pursue, you may want treatment that keeps you alive long enough to achieve them.​


If there is a good chance that your illness can be cured or managed, your doctor may advise you (or your agent) to first try available treatments. If these don't work, then you might think about stopping treatment.


If you stop treatment, you will still receive care that focuses on pain relief, comfort, and the quality of your life. This is called hospice or palliative care.

A decision to stop treatment that keeps you alive doesn't have to be permanent. You can always change your mind if your health starts to improve.


Note that the information contained on this page is generic and has been provided in response to clients who requested more detailed guidance as they review their draft documents in advance of our meeting to sign their estate plan. Please remember, we will always review and explain each document to you during our meeting, so that you understand before you sign.